The United Nations and Human Rights in Asia

Changrok SohDr. Changrok Soh of the Grad­u­ate School of Inter­na­tion­al Stud­ies at Korea Uni­ver­si­ty will present a dis­cus­sion titled “The UN and the Region­al Human Rights Mech­a­nism in Asia” at the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies on Mon­day, Jan­u­ary 30, 2017.

Changrok Soh is a promi­nent schol­ar, activist, and edu­ca­tor spe­cial­iz­ing in human rights, human secu­ri­ty, and inter­na­tion­al rela­tions. He is work­ing toward the estab­lish­ment of a sys­tem for the pro­mo­tion and pro­tec­tion of human rights in Asia. He is a mem­ber of the Unit­ed Nations Human Rights Coun­cil Advi­so­ry Com­mit­tee and is cur­rent­ly serv­ing as pres­i­dent of Human Asia. Soh received his Ph.D. from the Fletch­er School of Law and Diplo­ma­cy at Tufts Uni­ver­si­ty.

Soh’s talk will be deliv­ered in the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies Con­fer­ence Room begin­ning at 12 noon. The pro­gram will be mod­er­at­ed by Prof. Tae-Ung Baik of the William S. Richard­son School of Law.

Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies events are free and open to all. For fur­ther infor­ma­tion, includ­ing infor­ma­tion regard­ing access for the hand­i­capped, tele­phone the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies at (808) 956‑7041.

This pre­sen­ta­tion is sup­port­ed by the Core Uni­ver­si­ty Pro­gram for Kore­an Stud­ies through the Min­istry of Edu­ca­tion of the Repub­lic of Korea and the Kore­an Stud­ies Pro­mo­tion Ser­vice of the Acad­e­my of Kore­an Stud­ies (AKS-2015-OLU-2250005). It is co-spon­sored by Pacif­ic Asian Legal Stud­ies, William S. Richard­son School of Law, Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. The Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i is an equal opportunity/affirmative action Insti­tu­tion.

Conference on North Korean Human Rights and South Korean Aid Programs

North Korean human rights conference imageA one-day con­fer­ence at the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies on Thurs­day, April 14, 2016, will delve into North Kore­an human rights issues and some South Kore­an respons­es. The con­fer­ence, titled “North Kore­an Human Rights, South Korea’s Defec­tor Aid Pro­grams, and the Future of the Kore­an Penin­su­la,” will take place in the Center’s audi­to­ri­um from 12:30 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.

As a result of recent secu­ri­ty threats and ten­sions between the two Kore­as, North Korea has drawn inter­na­tion­al atten­tion. As one of the most repres­sive coun­tries in the world, with more than twen­ty thou­sand defec­tors, North Korea’s human rights cri­sis has become a focus of the Unit­ed Nations and many oth­er insti­tu­tions. This con­fer­ence is intend­ed to pro­vide a forum for dis­cus­sion of the chal­leng­ing con­di­tions in North Korea, South Korea’s pro­grams to accom­mo­date defec­tors from the North, and the future of the two Kore­as.

The con­fer­ence was orga­nized by two Cen­ter for Kore­an stud­ies fac­ul­ty mem­bers: Prof. Tae­‐Ung Baik of the William S. Richard­son School of Law and Prof. Young­‐a Park of the School of Pacif­ic and Asian Stud­ies. Baik and Park will be joined by five oth­er schol­ars and prac­ti­tion­ers: Jae-Hee Cho of the Cen­ter for North Kore­an Migrants and the Daegu Hana Cen­ter; Young-Chul Heo of Empa­thy SEEDS; Joan­na Hosa­ni­ak of the Cit­i­zens’ Alliance for North Kore­an Human Rights; Jane Kim of the Cen­ter for North Kore­an Migrants and the Daegu Hana Cen­ter; and Yeo-sang Yoon of the North Kore­an Human Rights Archives.

The par­tic­i­pants’ pre­sen­ta­tions will cov­er top­ics such as vic­tims’ accounts of North Kore­an human-rights vio­la­tions; women’s rights in North Korea; South Kore­an gov­ern­ment pol­i­cy toward defec­tors from the North; and pro­grams aimed at social inclu­sion of North Kore­an defec­tors.

The com­plete con­fer­ence sched­ule, with a list of the pre­sen­ta­tions and infor­ma­tion about the speak­ers, can be found here.

The con­fer­ence is free and open to the pub­lic. For fur­ther infor­ma­tion, includ­ing infor­ma­tion regard­ing access for the hand­i­capped, tele­phone the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies at (808) 956‑7041.

Sup­port for the con­fer­ence is fur­nished by the Core Uni­ver­si­ty Pro­gram for Kore­an Stud­ies through the Min­istry of Edu­ca­tion of the Repub­lic of Korea and the Kore­an Stud­ies Pro­mo­tion Ser­vice of the Acad­e­my of Kore­an Stud­ies (AKS-2015-OLU-2250005).

Call for Papers: East Asian Human Rights Cinema

Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema special issue on human rights cinemaThe Jour­nal of Japan­ese and Kore­an Cin­e­ma seeks orig­i­nal essays for a spe­cial issue of the jour­nal devot­ed to the sub­ject of East Asian human rights films. 

Pos­si­ble top­ics include, for exam­ple, films about: polit­i­cal refugees, pris­on­er abuse, and tor­ture; immi­gra­tion rights, labor issues, and work­er exploita­tion; home­less­ness and eco­nom­ic pover­ty; child labor, child abuse, and school bul­ly­ing; gen­der inequal­i­ty, women’s rights, and patri­archy; the treat­ment of eth­nic Kore­ans, Ainu, Buraku­min, and oth­er indige­nous minori­ties in Japan; nation­al divi­sion and the rela­tion­ship between North and South Kore­ans; sex­u­al minori­ties and LGBTQ com­mu­ni­ties; peo­ple liv­ing with cog­ni­tive and phys­i­cal dis­abil­i­ties; the fight for democ­ra­cy and oppo­si­tion to author­i­tar­i­an rule; and free­dom of speech and free­dom of the press.

Critical/cultural as well as his­tor­i­cal approach­es are wel­comed, par­tic­u­lar­ly those that empha­size the con­nec­tions between cin­e­mat­ic texts and their con­texts (of pro­duc­tion, exhi­bi­tion, transna­tion­al cir­cu­la­tion, etc.). The Jour­nal of Japan­ese and Kore­an Cin­e­ma is a peer-reviewed jour­nal that reflects the increas­ing­ly transna­tion­al sta­tus of East Asian film­mak­ing.

Send pro­pos­als (250–500 words) to Journal_JKC@hotmail.com by Feb­ru­ary 15, 2016. Once pro­pos­als have been select­ed, authors will have until May 15, 2016, to sub­mit their final essays (6,000–8,000 words).

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion, con­tact the journal’s co-edi­tor, David Scott Diffri­ent (Journal_JKC@hotmail.com), Depart­ment of Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Stud­ies, Col­orado State Uni­ver­si­ty.

For more infor­ma­tion about the Jour­nal of Japan­ese and Kore­an Cin­e­ma, fol­low this link.

International Conference: Our Ocean Planet

image: photo of oceanThe Jon Van Dyke Insti­tute of Inter­na­tion­al Law and Jus­tice, William S. Richard­son School of Law, East-West Cen­ter, and the Korea Insti­tute of Ocean Sci­ence and Tech­nol­o­gy will present an inter­na­tion­al con­fer­ence titled “Our Ocean Plan­et: Gov­er­nance for a Bet­ter Future” at the East-West Cen­ter Decem­ber 15, 2014.

The pro­gram will include pan­els on Mar­itime Claims in Asia and the Polar Regions; Pro­tect­ing the Ocean and its Resources; and Marine Sci­en­tif­ic Research and Emerg­ing Ocean Issues. In hon­or of Pro­fes­sor Van Dyke’s strong inter­est in human rights, there will also be a spe­cial pan­el on Recent Devel­op­ments in Human Rights in Asia.

The Con­fer­ence will be held in Burns Hall Rooms 3121/3125 at the East-West Cen­ter from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Spon­sors of the con­fer­ence are the Korea Insti­tute of Ocean Sci­ence & Tech­nol­o­gy, the Jon Van Dyke Insti­tute of Inter­na­tion­al Law and Jus­tice, the William S. Richard­son School of Law, the East-West Cen­ter, the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies, and the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i School of Pacif­ic and Asian Stud­ies.

For more infor­ma­tion, con­tact jvdinst@hawaii.edu.

Community Lecture: Legal Perspectives on Human Rights in North Korea

Photo: Baik Tae-UngThe Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies Com­mu­ni­ty Lec­ture Series returns on Sun­day, April 29, 2012, with a pre­sen­ta­tion by Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i law pro­fes­sor Tae-Ung Baik (백태웅) titled “Human Rights Vio­la­tions in North Korea: Legal Per­spec­tives” (북한의 인권침해와 북한법). The lec­ture will take place in the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies audi­to­ri­um from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

The CKS Com­mu­ni­ty Lec­ture Series, ini­ti­at­ed last year, is intend­ed to present talks of espe­cial inter­est to the local com­mu­ni­ty beyond the UH Mānoa cam­pus.

Dr. Baik attempts to gauge the seri­ous­ness of human rights vio­la­tions in the Demo­c­ra­t­ic People’s Repub­lic of Korea by exam­in­ing the country’s crim­i­nal process. The crim­i­nal jus­tice sys­tem and the actu­al crim­i­nal process in North Korea are not com­plete­ly known to the world, and it is impor­tant to ana­lyze the actu­al process­es of the sys­tem in order to come to an accu­rate under­stand­ing of the human rights vio­la­tions in the soci­ety. By com­par­ing the writ­ten laws and the actu­al prac­tices, he pro­vides an expla­na­tion of North Kore­an crim­i­nal pro­ce­dure and human rights prac­tice.

Tae-Ung Baik is asso­ciate pro­fes­sor of law in the William S. Richard­son School of Law at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. He was for­mer­ly direc­tor of the Kore­an Legal Stud­ies Pro­gram at the Uni­ver­si­ty of British Colum­bia. Baik grad­u­at­ed from the Seoul Nation­al Uni­ver­si­ty Col­lege of Law and earned master’s and doc­tor­al degrees at the Notre Dame Law School. He teach­es inter­na­tion­al crim­i­nal law, human rights, and Kore­an law. He is a mem­ber of the bar of the state of New York, worked for Human Rights Watch in New York, and served as a legal advis­er in the South Kore­an del­e­ga­tion to the 56th Unit­ed Nations Sub-Com­mis­sion on the Pro­mo­tion and Pro­tec­tion of Human Rights. His book, Emerg­ing Region­al Human Rights Sys­tems in Asia, is forth­com­ing from Cam­bridge Uni­ver­si­ty Press.

This lec­ture is free and open to all. It will be pre­sent­ed in Eng­lish with Kore­an trans­la­tion. UH cam­pus park­ing is free on Sun­days, includ­ing the park­ing area next to the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies at 1881 East-West Road. For fur­ther infor­ma­tion, tele­phone (808) 956‑7041 or (808) 428‑1789.