Korean Culture Day 2017

Korean Culture Day promoThe stu­dents of the UH Manoa Kore­an Lan­guage Flag­ship Cen­ter will stage their annu­al Kore­an Cul­ture Day pro­gram at the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies Fri­day, Feb­ru­ary 10, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The free pro­gram – open to all – offers oppor­tu­ni­ties to play tra­di­tion­al Kore­an games such as chegich’agi, a foot-shut­tle­cock game, and kong­gi, Kore­an jacks; try on tra­di­tion­al cos­tume, or han­bok; and try a turn at brush cal­lig­ra­phy in Kore­an. Sam­ples of Kore­an food will also be available.

The Kore­an Lan­guage Flag­ship Cen­ter, part of the Depart­ment of East Asian Lan­guages and Cul­tures, is a con­cen­trat­ed pro­gram to pro­duce grad­u­ates with advanced lan­guage skills. Oth­er spon­sors of Kore­an Cul­ture Day include the Han­woori Club, the Fran­cis A. and Bet­ty Ann Keala Fund in Arts and Sci­ences, Pala­ma Super­mar­ket, Fab­ric Mart, Alo­ha Dryclean­ers, Ohana Pacif­ic Bank, Kukui Food Inc., Tony Moly, and the Hawaii Chris­t­ian Church.

For more infor­ma­tion about Kore­an Cul­ture Day 2017, con­tact Pro­fes­sor Mary S. Kim (maryskim@hawaii.edu) of the Depart­ment of East Asian Lan­guages. For pho­tos of last year’s Cul­ture Day fes­tiv­i­ties, fol­low this link.

Korean Culture Day March 11

The Korean Language Flagship Center; Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures; College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature; and Center for Korean Studies present the annual Korean Culture Day Activities

Korean culture day poster

For further information, contact flagship@hawaii.edu or telephone (808) 956‑8469.

Critical Issues Forum Addresses History of North Korea

Two pro­grams on North Korea form the agen­da for the sixth Forum on Crit­i­cal Issues in Kore­an Stud­ies April 9 – 10, 2015, at the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies. The Crit­i­cal Issues Forum was begun in 2010 as a mech­a­nism to bring out­stand­ing schol­ars from around the world to the Mānoa cam­pus for dis­cus­sions of impor­tant con­tem­po­rary topics. 

photo of Andre SchmidThe speak­er for the 2015 Forum is Andre Schmid, an asso­ciate pro­fes­sor in the Depart­ment of East Asian Stud­ies at the Uni­ver­si­ty of Toron­to. Schmid, who earned his Ph.D. at Colum­bia Uni­ver­si­ty, cur­rent­ly research­es the his­to­ry of the cul­tur­al Cold War in post-Kore­an War penin­su­la as well as ear­ly twen­ti­eth-cen­tu­ry peas­ant move­ments. He is the author of Korea Between Empires, 1895 – 1919 (Colum­bia Uni­ver­si­ty Press) and win­ner of the Asso­ci­a­tion for Asian Stud­ies John Whit­ney Hall Award for out­stand­ing book of the year. His arti­cles have appeared in the Jour­nal of Asian Stud­ies, South Atlantic Quar­ter­ly, and Yŏk­sa munje yŏn’gu, and he is cur­rent­ly work­ing on a book on post­war domes­tic­i­ty in North Korea, titled Social­ist Liv­ing in North Korea, 1953‒1965.

The for­mat of the two-day event includes a pub­lic lec­ture on the first day and a pre­sen­ta­tion in a sem­i­nar set­ting on the sec­ond day. Schmid’s April 9 lec­ture is titled “Is a His­to­ry of North Korea with­out Kim Il Sung Pos­si­ble?” The lec­ture will take place in the Cen­ter audi­to­ri­um from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

The sec­ond-day top­ic is “The Mun­dane­ness of the North Kore­an Rev­o­lu­tion.” The pro­gram will take place in the Cen­ter con­fer­ence room from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

The Forum on Crit­i­cal Issues in Kore­an Stud­ies is free and open to the pub­lic. The Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies is locat­ed at 1881 East-West Road on the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai‘i Mānoa cam­pus. Lim­it­ed, paid ($6.00) pub­lic park­ing is avail­able in the park­ing lot adja­cent to the Cen­ter and in oth­er vis­i­tor park­ing lots on cam­pus. For more infor­ma­tion about park­ing reg­u­la­tions and loca­tions, con­sult the cam­pus park­ing office Web page. For fur­ther infor­ma­tion about the Forum, includ­ing infor­ma­tion about access for the hand­i­capped, tele­phone the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies at (808) 956‑7041.

Pre­sen­ta­tion of the Crit­i­cal Issues in Kore­an Stud­ies Forum is sup­port­ed by the Doo Wook and Helen Nahm Choy Fund.

Korean Culture Day 2015

Korean Culture Day artThe stu­dents and fac­ul­ty of the Depart­ment of East Asian Lan­guages and Lit­er­a­tures and the Kore­an Lan­guage Flag­ship Cen­ter will present their annu­al Kore­an Cul­ture Day pro­gram on Fri­day, March 13, 2015, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the Cen­ter for Kore­an Studies. 

Kore­an Cul­ture Day activ­i­ties typ­i­cal­ly include tra­di­tion­al brush cal­lig­ra­phy; tak­ing pic­tures wear­ing tra­di­tion­al Kore­an cloth­ing (han­bok 한복); play­ing tra­di­tion­al games such as chegich’agi (제기차기), a foot-shut­tle­cock game; ttakchich’igi (딱지치기), a fold­ed-paper flip­ping match; and kong­gi (공기), Kore­an jacks; and taek­won­do demon­stra­tions. There are always Kore­an food items to sam­ple too.

The Kore­an Cul­ture Day pro­gram is free and open to all.

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion, con­tact Prof. Mary S. Kim (maryskim@hawaii.edu) or the Kore­an Lan­guage Flag­ship Cen­ter (flagship@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956‑8469.

Fall Korean Film Series Wraps with 1981 Social Drama

image: movie posterThe CKS fall Kore­an film series, “Liv­ing Apart? Apart­ments in Kore­an Cin­e­ma,” wraps up on Tues­day, Decem­ber 2, with the 1981 real­ist social dra­ma The Ball Shot by a Midget (난장이가 쏘아올린 작은 공), which depicts the dif­fi­cult lives of the alien­at­ed low­er class­es dur­ing Korea’s mod­ern­iza­tion process.

Adapt­ed from a nov­el by Cho Se-hee and direct­ed by Lee Won-se, the film cen­ters on Kim Bul, who is a lit­tle per­son liv­ing in a shack by a salt field with his wife and three chil­dren. His old­est son is work­ing in the salt field and his youngest daugh­ter is work­ing in a bak­ery to help their father sup­port the fam­i­ly. Things are already hard for this fam­i­ly when Kim receives an evic­tion notice from the gov­ern­ment. He receives a tick­et to move into an apart­ment that is to be built on the land where his house cur­rent­ly stands. He soon real­izes, how­ev­er, that he can­not pos­si­bly make the move with the family’s mea­ger means. Hav­ing nowhere else to go, the fam­i­ly is left with dif­fi­cult choices. 

Film screen­ings take place in the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies Noh Audi­to­ri­um at 1881 East-West Road on the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai’i Mānoa cam­pus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Kore­an films are shown with Eng­lish sub­ti­tles. This series is free and open to all Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai’i stu­dents, fac­ul­ty, and staff and to the com­mu­ni­ty at large. Lim­it­ed, paid ($6.00) pub­lic park­ing is avail­able in the park­ing lot adja­cent to the Cen­ter and in oth­er vis­i­tor park­ing lots on campus. 

The fall film series was curat­ed by Prof. Myungji Yang of the Uni­ver­si­ty of Hawai’i at Mānoa Depart­ment of Polit­i­cal Sci­ence and was pro­duced with the assis­tance of Hye-yoon Choi. The series is sup­port­ed by the Tim­o­thy and Miri­am Wee Memo­r­i­al Fund at the Cen­ter for Kore­an Studies.

For fur­ther infor­ma­tion, con­tact the Cen­ter for Kore­an Stud­ies at (808) 956‑7041 or Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956‑6387.