The Korea Foundation Provides Overseas Internships for Young Koreans

The Korea Foundation offers the next-generation talents of Korea a chance to gain real-life work experience at some of the world’s leading research-policy institutes, museums, libraries, and universities. Based on cooperative relationships with influential institutions, the Foundation’s Global Challengers program placed forty-eight interns at thirty-two institutions in nineteen counties in 2014. An additional thirty institutions have recently joined the program.

The Global Challengers program provides opportunities in four areas:

  • The KF Think-Tank Internship provides Korean graduate students with opportunities to serve as interns at leading policy-research institutions in order to gain international experience.
  • The KF Museum Internship enables career-minded Korean students majoring in museum-related fields and junior-level curators to acquire real-life work experiences at some of the world’s finest museums.
  • The KF Library Internship is designed to provide valuable work experience and related opportunities at prestigious libraries abroad to young Koreans desiring to upgrade and advance their professional careers as librarians specializing in Korean studies.
  • The KF Korean Language Education Internship supports Korean language education at overseas universities that provide Korean language courses on a regular credit basis by dispatching graduate students or junior lecturers as teaching assistants to Korean language programs at overseas universities.

photo of Giroung Lim
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Giroung Lim, the Korea Foundation 2014-2015 library intern at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, divides her time between working with the Korean cataloger at Hamilton Library and working with the Center for Korean Studies archives and manuscripts collection.

For all of these programs, the Korea Foundation provides round-trip air fare from Korea to the destination city; a monthly stipend for living and housing expenses; and international health insurance coverage. Internships average six months.

Eligibility for internships include these requirements:

  • Library Internship: Applicants should be holders of (at least) level-2 librarian certification with an adequate level of English language competency; must be Korean nationals; must be under forty years of age; must have excellent research and communication capacities; must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.35 (on a 4.5 scale) or equivalent; and must have no restrictions that prevent travel abroad. For further details, see the current announcement.
  • Think Tank Internship: Analytic skills with a strong technical, scientific, or field background in a particular area; ability to conduct research in an English-speaking and writing environment; Korean nationality; under forty years of age; cumulative GPA of at least 3.35 (on a 4.5 scale) or equivalent; no restrictions that prevent travel abroad. For more details, see the current recruitment announcement.
  • Museum Internship: Applicants must be young potential or junior-level professionals (including curators) who have an M.A. degree or higher committed to pursuing an academic or museum career; be Korean nationals; be under forty years of age; have excellent research and communication capacities, including the ability to speak and write clearly in English; have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.35 (on a 4.5 scale) or equivalent; and have no restrictions that prevent travel abroad. For more details, see the current announcement.
  • Korean Language Education Internship: Internship applicants must be (at least) currently enrolled in a graduate-level degree program in Korean language education as a foreign language or its equivalent academic area with relevant teaching experience; must be Korean nationals; must be under forty years of age; must have excellent communication capacities; must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.35 (on a 4.5 scale) or equivalent; and must have no restrictions that prevent travel abroad. For more details, see the current announcement.

Dysfunctional Family Drama Is Film Series Finale

image of poster for Boomerang FamilyThe Center for Korean Studies spring 2015 film series—Castaway in Korean Society—wraps up April 14 with Boomerang Family (고령화 가족), a 2013 feature directed by Song Hae-sung. The film concludes a series of cinematic explorations of life in contemporary South Korean society since its transformation by the uncertainties and changes that began with the 1997 economic crisis. For this series finale, light refreshments will be served at 5:30 p.m. before the screening.

In Boomerang Family we meet In-mo, a man in serious distress because his first movie as a director was a big failure, his wife has left him for another man, and he is unable to pay rent. Depressed, he decides to hang himself. He is saved by a phone call from his mother inviting him for dinner, which leads to a change of plan. He decides to move back into his mother’s house. His older brother Han-mo is already living there after being released from prison. Han-mo is an unemployed ex-gangster with five criminal convictions. The two are soon joined by their younger sister, Mi-yeon, who arrives with her rebellious teenage daughter, Min-kyung. She is about to divorce her second husband and has no place to stay. The once quiet and serene home of their mother is forever shattered when the three grown-up children return for a family reunion. See the link to the film’s trailer below for glimpses of the movie.

Film screenings take place in the Center for Korean Studies auditorium at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai‘i Mānoa campus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Korean films are shown with English subtitles. Admission is free and open to all. The series is supported by the Timothy and Miriam Wee Memorial Fund at the Center for Korean Studies.

For further information about the film series, contact the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041 or Professor Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956-6387.

Limited, paid ($6.00) public parking is available in the parking lot adjacent to the Center and in other visitor parking lots on campus. For more information about parking regulations and locations, consult the campus parking office Web page.

 

Jejueo: Korea’s Other Language

photo of William O'GradyLinguists are more and more coming to recognize that the traditional variety of speech used on Jeju Island is substantially different from standard Korean and deserves to be treated as a language in itself, not just a dialect. One of those working on this issue is Prof. William O’Grady of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Department of Linguistics, a member of the Center for Korean Studies faculty.

The Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures Talk Series will present a discussion by O’Grady on recent research on the language of Jeju on Friday, April 10, 2015, at 3:00 p.m. in Moore Hall Room 119.

O’Grady will describe research conducted with Dr. Changyong Yang of Jeju National University and Sejung Yang, a Ph.D. student in linguistics at the University of Hawai‘i. Their work includes an intelligibility experiment suggesting that Koreans in Seoul, Busan, and Yeosu are unable to understand Jejueo, thus lending weight to the proposition that it deserves to be classified as a separate language. A second experiment assessed the proficiency of younger speakers of Jejueo.

The talk is free and open to the public. For further information, contact DongKwan Kong (dongkwan@hawaii.edu) or L. Julie Jiang (lijiang@hawaii.edu).

Critical Issues Forum Addresses History of North Korea

Two programs on North Korea form the agenda for the sixth Forum on Critical Issues in Korean Studies April 9-10, 2015, at the Center for Korean Studies. The Critical Issues Forum was begun in 2010 as a mechanism to bring outstanding scholars from around the world to the Mānoa campus for discussions of important contemporary topics.

photo of Andre SchmidThe speaker for the 2015 Forum is Andre Schmid, an associate professor in the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto. Schmid, who earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University, currently researches the history of the cultural Cold War in post-Korean War peninsula as well as early twentieth-century peasant movements. He is the author of Korea Between Empires, 1895-1919 (Columbia University Press) and winner of the Association for Asian Studies John Whitney Hall Award for outstanding book of the year. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Asian Studies, South Atlantic Quarterly, and Yŏksa munje yŏn’gu, and he is currently working on a book on postwar domesticity in North Korea, titled Socialist Living in North Korea, 1953‒1965.

The format of the two-day event includes a public lecture on the first day and a presentation in a seminar setting on the second day. Schmid’s April 9 lecture is titled “Is a History of North Korea without Kim Il Sung Possible?” The lecture will take place in the Center auditorium from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

The second-day topic is “The Mundaneness of the North Korean Revolution.” The program will take place in the Center conference room from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m.

The Forum on Critical Issues in Korean Studies is free and open to the public. The Center for Korean Studies is located at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai‘i Mānoa campus. Limited, paid ($6.00) public parking is available in the parking lot adjacent to the Center and in other visitor parking lots on campus. For more information about parking regulations and locations, consult the campus parking office Web page. For further information about the Forum, including information about access for the handicapped, telephone the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041.

Presentation of the Critical Issues in Korean Studies Forum is supported by the Doo Wook and Helen Nahm Choy Fund.

The China-Taiwan Relationship and Its Bearing on Korea

photo of Young-gil SongThe Center for Korean Studies spring colloquium series will present a discussion of China-Korea relations by Young-gil Song on Thursday, April 2, 2015, at 4:00 p.m. in the Center auditorium. Song served at the mayor of Inch’ŏn from 2010 to 2014. Prior to that, he was a three-term member of the Republic of Korea National Assembly, where he served on the Legislation and Judiciary Committee and the Finance and Economy Committee. He also was a well-known democracy movement student activist in the early 1980s.

Song is currently a visiting scholar at Tsinghua University of China and is conducting research on the relationship between China and Taiwan. His colloquium talk is titled “The Relationship between China and Taiwan and Its Implications for the Inter-Korean Relationship.”

Center for Korean Studies colloquia are free and open to the public. The Center is located at 1881 East-West Road on the UH Mānoa campus. Paid parking ($6.00) is available in the parking lot mauka of the CKS building and elsewhere on campus. For more information about parking, consult the campus parking office Web page. For further information about the colloquium, including arrangements for access for the handicapped, telephone the Center at (808) 956-7041.

Mysterious Disappearance at the Center of Film Series Offering

still image from HelplessThe Center for Korean Studies spring 2015 film series continues on Tuesday, March 31, with a multilayered mystery titled Helpless (화차), directed by Byun Young-joo. The film is fourth in a series titled Castaway in Korean Society exploring aspects of life in a contemporary South Korean society transformed by economic uncertainty and social changes set in motion by the 1997 economic crisis. The films for the series were selected by Professor Myungji Yang of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Department of Political Science, assisted by Hye-yoon Choi.

Helpless, released in 2012, is based on the Japanese mystery novel Kasha (“a one-way train to hell”). The plot begins with Mun-ho, a soon-to-be groom, on his way to his parents’ house with his fiancée, Seon-yeong. They decide to stop at a highway rest stop for coffee, but when he returns to the car, Seon-yeong is gone. Convinced that she has been kidnapped, Mun-ho begins a frantic search. He asks his cousin Jong-geun, a former detective, for help, and together they dig deeper into her disappearance. While searching for Seon-young, Mun-ho uncovers startling secrets about her. As the intricate layers of Seon-young’s past are revealed, it turns out that she was not the woman he thought she was, not even her name.

For background on the series and the schedule, see http://bit.ly/1AhVUHN. See below for a link to the advertising trailer for Helpless.

Film screenings take place in the Center for Korean Studies auditorium at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai’i Mānoa campus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Korean films are shown with English subtitles.

This series is free and open to all University of Hawai’i students, faculty, and staff and to the community at large. The series is supported by the Timothy and Miriam Wee Memorial Fund at the Center for Korean Studies.

For further information about the film series, contact the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041 or Professor Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956-6387.

Limited, paid ($6.00) public parking is available in the parking lot adjacent to the Center and in other visitor parking lots on campus. For more information about parking regulations and locations, consult the campus parking office Web page.