University of Western Australia Seeks Lecturer in Korean Studies

image: University of Western Australia crestThe School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Australia seeks applicants for appointment as a lecturer in Korean studies. This is a three-year appointment with a salary range of $90,468 to $107,431 per annum plus 17% superannuation.

Key responsibilities of the position include development of undergraduate and postgraduate teaching in Korean studies programs; supervising honors and postgraduate-level students; conducting research independently or in collaboration with others; administrative duties as required in relation to the above teaching and research supervision; working collaboratively within the undergraduate and postgraduate teaching teams and supporting the University’s commitment to equity and diversity principles; and teaching in other programs within the School, Faculty, and University in related areas.

Applicants should have a Ph.D. (or be near completion) in any discipline in Korean studies; have an excellent record of research publications; show evidence of an ability to attract research funding and to build research collaborations with external and internal partners; be capable of attracting and supervising research students; have excellent written and oral skills in Korean and English; be able and willing to develop, co-ordinate, and teach Korean language units at all undergraduate levels; show evidence of a commitment to pursue the best educational practices, including student-led teaching practices, on-line teaching, and other teaching approaches that align with the UWA’s Educational Principles; and be able to relate well to staff and students at all levels and be committed to equity and diversity principles.

The closing date for applications is Friday, November 14, 2014. For an on-line application and further details, see http://external.jobs.uwa.edu.au/cw/en/job/493588/lecturer-korean-studies-ref-493588.

“Green Fish” Is Next in CKS Fall Film Series

still image from Green FishThe Center for Korean Studies fall film series, “Living Apart? Apartments in Korean Cinema,” continues Tuesday, October 28, 2014, with the 1997 feature Green Fish (초록물고기), the debut film of director Lee Chang-dong. The series, programmed by Prof. Myungji Yang of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Department of Political Science, is presenting films dealing in various ways with apartment life, a key marker of current Korean society.

Green Fish begins with a scene on a train. Mak-dong, returning from military service, learns that nothing is the same when he reaches his home. The fields have been replaced by high-rise apartments, and his family has become fragmented. While looking for a job in Seoul, he runs into Mi-ae, whom he had met on the train, this time singing at a nightclub. She introduces him to Tae-gon, a gang boss, and Mak-dong soon drifts into gang life. In this acutely intelligent film, Lee depicts the lives of unwitting victims of urbanization in a chilling and vivid way.

Screenings take place in the Center for Korean Studies Auditorium at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai’i Mānoa campus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Korean films are shown with English subtitles. Attendance is free and open to all University of Hawai’i students, faculty, and staff and to the community at large. The series is supported by the Timothy and Miriam Wee Memorial Fund at the Center for Korean Studies.

For further information about the film series, contact the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041 or Professor Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956-6387.

Cha-do: The Korean Way of Tea in History and Today

photo: rother Anthony and Hong Kyeong-Hee
The Center for Korean Studies will present a special program on tea in Korea in its fall colloquium series on Tuesday, October 14, 2014. The program will feature Brother Anthony of Taizé and Master Hyoam, Hong Kyeong-Hee, who will talk about the history of tea in Korea and comment on its place in contemporary Korean life. They will also prepare tea and demonstrate Korean tea practices.

image: cover of Korean Way of TeaBrother Anthony (An Sonjae) is a translator, scholar, and member of the Taizé Community who has become a naturalized Korean citizen and lives in Seoul. He is emeritus professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Sogang University. Brother Anthony has translated numerous literary works from Korean into English, has published several books on Western literature, and is the co-author of The Korean Way of Tea: An Introductory Guide (2007). Master Hyoam (Hong Kyeong-Hee) is a tea master in the Sŏn (Zen) tea tradition of Hyodang. He lives in a tea field at the foot of Jiri Mountain. He is the co-author of The Korean Way of Tea: An Introductory Guide.

The program will take place in the Center for Korean Studies auditorium from 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Center for Korean Studies colloquia are free and open to the public. The Center is located at 1881 East-West Road on the UH Mānoa campus. Paid parking is available mauka of the CKS building. For further information, including information about arrangements for access for the handicapped, telephone the Center at (808) 956-7041.

Intertwined Lives of Two Apartment Dwellers Revealed in Film Series Entry

still image from 301/302The Center for Korean Studies fall 2014 film series continues Tuesday, October 14, with 301/302 (삼공일 삼공이), the 1996 feature directed by Park Chul-Soon that tracks the interactions of two women living in neighboring apartments. The title of the film refers to their respective apartment numbers.

The story begins with a detective calling Song-hee in apartment 301 to question her about the disappearance of Yoon-hee, the resident of 302. Song-hee is a compulsive cook who takes pleasure in caring for her husband. He ignores her efforts, however, and she becomes a binge eater. Neighbor Yoon-hee is a writer suffering from anorexia. As a child, she was sexually abused by her stepfather and has found herself disgusted by both food and the act of intercourse. Their tragic pasts and food disorders bring them together, but each pursues happiness in completely different ways.

The fall film series, “Living Apart? Apartments in Korean Cinema,” is presenting a series of cinematic representations of apartment life as a key to understanding current Korean society. High-rise apartment buildings are the prototypical type of modern housing in Korean cities. They are both an indicator of one’s socioeconomic status and a symbol of dreams and aspirations. This series was programmed by Prof. Myungji Yang of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Department of Political Science and was produced with the assistance of Hye-yoon Choi.

Screenings take place in the Center for Korean Studies Auditorium at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai’i Mānoa campus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Korean films are shown with English subtitles. Attendance is free and open to all University of Hawai’i students, faculty, and staff and to the community at large. The series is supported by the Timothy and Miriam Wee Memorial Fund at the Center for Korean Studies.

For further information about the film series, contact the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041 or Professor Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956-6387.

Call for Papers: Korea University Korean History Graduate Student Conference

Korea University logoThe Korea University Korean History (KUKH) Graduate Student Conference invites graduate students from around the world who are conducting research in Korean history to submit abstracts for its 2015 conference. The KUKH Graduate Student Conference is an annual conference that provides a forum for graduate students to exchange ideas and discuss current research on Korean history. The one-day conference on Korea University’s Anam campus in Seoul will take place May 1, 2015. All panels will be moderated by Korea University faculty and graduate students.

The special theme of the 2015 conference is “Incorporating Different Perspectives on Korean History.” Papers may focus on any historical time period. Although broad, the theme was selected to encourage graduate students studying abroad to include innovative interpretations, new perspectives, and fresh approaches to Korean history. The May 2014 conference hosted eight graduate student presenters from five countries and eight educational institutions.

Eligibility and Application Guidelines

  1. Applicants must be currently enrolled in a program of graduate study (“postgraduate” in the British degree classification systems).
  2. Papers must be related to Korean history.
  3. Abstracts must be no longer than 250 words.
  4. The deadline for submitting abstracts is Wednesday, December 31, 2014.

When submitting abstracts, include your name, program of graduate study, and contact information. Successful applicants will be notified of acceptance by mid-January. Housing will be available for those presenting papers.

For general conference and abstract submission inquiries, contact koreanhistoryconference@gmail.com.