Mysterious Disappearance at the Center of Film Series Offering

Featured

still image from Helpless
image-4488
The Center for Korean Studies spring 2015 film series continues on Tuesday, March 31, with a multilayered mystery titled Helpless (화차), directed by Byun Young-joo. The film is fourth in a series titled Castaway in Korean Society exploring aspects of life in a contemporary South Korean society transformed by economic uncertainty and social changes set in motion by the 1997 economic crisis. The films for the series were selected by Professor Myungji Yang of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Department of Political Science, assisted by Hye-yoon Choi.

Helpless, released in 2012, is based on the Japanese mystery novel Kasha (“a one-way train to hell”). The plot begins with Mun-ho, a soon-to-be groom, on his way to his parents’ house with his fiancée, Seon-yeong. They decide to stop at a highway rest stop for coffee, but when he returns to the car, Seon-yeong is gone. Convinced that she has been kidnapped, Mun-ho begins a frantic search. He asks his cousin Jong-geun, a former detective, for help, and together they dig deeper into her disappearance. While searching for Seon-young, Mun-ho uncovers startling secrets about her. As the intricate layers of Seon-young’s past are revealed, it turns out that she was not the woman he thought she was, not even her name.

For background on the series and the schedule, see http://bit.ly/1AhVUHN. See below for a link to the advertising trailer for Helpless.

Film screenings take place in the Center for Korean Studies auditorium at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai’i Mānoa campus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Korean films are shown with English subtitles.

This series is free and open to all University of Hawai’i students, faculty, and staff and to the community at large. The series is supported by the Timothy and Miriam Wee Memorial Fund at the Center for Korean Studies.

For further information about the film series, contact the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041 or Professor Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956-6387.

Limited, paid ($6.00) public parking is available in the parking lot adjacent to the Center and in other visitor parking lots on campus. For more information about parking regulations and locations, consult the campus parking office Web page.

 

The China-Taiwan Relationship and Its Bearing on Korea

photo of Young-gil Song
image-4501
The Center for Korean Studies spring colloquium series will present a discussion of China-Korea relations by Young-gil Song on Thursday, April 2, 2015, at 4:00 p.m. in the Center auditorium. Song served at the mayor of Inch’ŏn from 2010 to 2014. Prior to that, he was a three-term member of the Republic of Korea National Assembly, where he served on the Legislation and Judiciary Committee and the Finance and Economy Committee. He also was a well-known democracy movement student activist in the early 1980s.

Song is currently a visiting scholar at Tsinghua University of China and is conducting research on the relationship between China and Taiwan. His colloquium talk is titled “The Relationship between China and Taiwan and Its Implications for the Inter-Korean Relationship.”

Center for Korean Studies colloquia are free and open to the public. The Center is located at 1881 East-West Road on the UH Mānoa campus. Paid parking ($6.00) is available in the parking lot mauka of the CKS building and elsewhere on campus. For more information about parking, consult the campus parking office Web page. For further information about the colloquium, including arrangements for access for the handicapped, telephone the Center at (808) 956-7041.

Korean Studies Workshop for Junior Faculty

image: SSRC logo
image-4480
The Social Science Research Council’s Korean Studies Workshop for Junior Faculty offers recent recipients of the Ph.D. who are conducting research on Korea an opportunity to give and receive critical feedback on books in progress. Six participants will be selected on the basis of the potential contribution of their proposed books. They will attend a three-day workshop and collaborate with two senior faculty and a developmental editor on the conceptualization and planning of a dissertation-based scholarly monograph.

The 2015 workshop will take place Thursday, August 6, through Monday, August 10, at the University of California at Santa Cruz Conference Center in Santa Cruz, California. Applicants must have had their Ph.D. in hand by December 31, 2014, with a critical mass of their first book manuscript complete (for example, the introduction and two substantive chapters). Applicants in tenure-track positions are particularly encouraged to apply. The deadline for applications is Friday, May 1, 2015.

For the application and more information about requirements, see http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/ksfacultyworkshop. Funding for the workshop is provided by the Korea Foundation. The workshop will cover the travel costs to Santa Cruz, three nights of accommodations, and meals. Funds are limited for participants traveling to the workshop from overseas.

For further information, send e-mail to korea@ssrc.org.

SSRC Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop Invites Applications

image: workshop banner
image-4472
The Social Science Research Council Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop offers advanced graduate students an opportunity to give and receive critical feedback on dissertations in progress. The 2015 workshop will take place Thursday, August 6, through Monday, August 10, at the University of California at Santa Cruz Conference Center in Santa Cruz, California. It will involve twelve students and four faculty members.

During the workshop, individual students lead discussions of their projects with mentor faculty and peers from various disciplines to receive creative and critical input on improving their fieldwork plans or writing strategies. Based on narrative project descriptions submitted as part of the application packet, participants will prepare a synthetic essay incorporating all projects, from which broader methodological and thematic discussions will be developed and incorporated into the four-day agenda.

Full-time advanced graduate students in any social science or humanities field, regardless of citizenship, are eligible to participate. Applicants must have completed all degree requirements except the dissertation and must have an approved dissertation prospectus but cannot have completed writing for final submission. The workshop is open to students who have not yet begun fieldwork, those who are currently in the field, and those who are in the process of writing their dissertations. Special consideration will be given to students from universities that are not major Korean studies institutions.

This year’s mentor faculty will be announced at a later date.

For the application and more information, see http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/ksdw. Applications must include, in addition to the application form, a narrative description of the dissertation topic and letter of recommendation from the student’s primary advisor. The deadline for applications is Friday, May 1, 2015.

In most cases, the SSRC will fully cover participants’ travel, lodging, and meals for the duration of the workshop. Limited funds are available for participants traveling from outside the United States. Funding for the program is provided by the Korea Foundation.

For further information, send e-mail to korea@ssrc.org.

Waikiki Brothers: A Band in Decline

The Center for Korean Studies 2015 spring film series reaches its midpoint on Tuesday, March 17, with the showing of Waikiki Brothers (와이키키 브라더스), a feature directed by Yim Soon-rye and released in 2001.

The spring series, titled Castaway in Korean Society, is presenting filmic explorations of life in contemporary South Korean society in a world transformed by economic uncertainty and social changes set in motion by the 1997 economic crisis. The films for the series were selected by Professor Myungji Yang of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Department of Political Science, assisted by Hye-yoon Choi.

still image from Waikiki Brothers
image-4461
Waikiki Brothers is the story of a band of that name. The band has has seen better times, especially before the spread of karaoke. Its membership drops from seven to four and then even further down to three when the saxophonist quits after another disappointing performance. The remaining three decide to return to Suanbo, the hometown of the leader, Sung-woo, and the birthplace of the band. The band starts playing at Waikiki Hotel, and Sung-woo encounters high school mates who were the original members of Waikiki Brothers back in 1980s. He also meets In-hee, his childhood crush, who is now widowed. He learns that none of them is where he or she wants to be in life. It is nothing like what they had imagined when they were young. The band is brought to a new low when it is kicked out of the hotel. Despite the continuous piling-on of depressing events, Sung-woo quietly plays on.

For background on the series and the schedule, see http://bit.ly/1AhVUHN. See below for a link to the advertising trailer for Waikiki Brothers.

Film screenings take place in the Center for Korean Studies auditorium at 1881 East-West Road on the University of Hawai’i Mānoa campus and begin at 6:30 p.m. Korean films are shown with English subtitles.

This series is free and open to all University of Hawai’i students, faculty, and staff and to the community at large. The series is supported by the Timothy and Miriam Wee Memorial Fund at the Center for Korean Studies.

For further information about the film series, contact the Center for Korean Studies at (808) 956-7041 or Professor Myungji Yang (myang4@hawaii.edu) at (808) 956-6387.

Limited, paid ($6.00) public parking is available in the parking lot adjacent to the Center and in other visitor parking lots on campus. For more information about parking regulations and locations, consult the campus parking office Web page.

 

Changing Relationships Between and Among the United States, China, Japan, and Korea

photo: Jin-Hyun Kim
image-4452
The William S. Richardson School of Law will present a discussion of Korea’s geopolitical environment and its potential as a trendsetter in East Asia March 13, 2015, from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. The speaker will be Jin Hyun Kim, who has served as chairman of The World Peace Forum since 2001. The Forum is the publisher of the annual World Peace Index.

Mr. Kim started his professional career as a journalist at the newspaper Dong-a Ilbo and was promoted to editor-in-chief in 1984. He was later appointed to serve as the minister of science and technology of the Republic of Korea from 1990 to 1993 and also served as president of the University of Seoul from 1995 to 1999.

Kim’s talk, titled “Changing Relationships Between and Among the United States, China, Japan, and Korea,” will take place in William S. Richardson School of Law Classroom 2. For further information, contact Professor Tae-Ung Baik (tubaik@hawaii.edu).